Alexander
Born: March 2002
Arrived: November 22, 2002
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Sabrina
Born: 1996
Arrived: December 1996
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Sabrina
Dakota
Born: March 2002
Arrived: November 22, 2002
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Sabu
Born: November 20, 1998
Arrived: May 4, 2006
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Sabu
Jiang
Born: 1995
Arrived: June 1998
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Shatari
Born: June 25, 2006
Arrived: August 26, 2006
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Shatari
Mendhi Racana
Born: September 21, 2003
Arrived: 12/4/03
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Shere Khan
Born: June 25, 2006
Arrived: January 7, 2007
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Shere Khan
 Mona
 Born: April 2003
Arrived: August 4, 2004
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Simba
Born: April 3, 2003
Arrived: July 7, 2003
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Simba
Natasha
Born: 1996
Arrived: September 1997
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Zoe
Born: April 2003
Arrived: August 4, 2004
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Zoe
Precious
Born: 1994
Arrived: July 1998
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The tiger (panthera tigris) is the largest of the big cats. Bengal tigers (panthera Tigris Tigris) are smaller than the Siberian tigers. A male stands between 2 and 3 feet tall at the shoulder. They can measure 8 to 9 feet long from head to tip of tail. They can weigh from 350 to 700 pounds. The female Bengal tiger is slightly smaller. The tiger is mostly nocturnal, sleeping throughout the day. Like all subspecies of tigers, the male Bengal is solitary, shunning other males, and the female lives in family units. Bengal tigers are carnivorous, and can live over 20 years in captivity. Unlike the African lion, tigers enjoy the water, preferring to live in close proximity to streams, rivers and lakes.
In the wild, the Bengal tiger is found throughout the Indian subcontinent. It is believed that none are left in Pakistan, and only a small number can be found in Bangladesh. The Bengal tiger's main stronghold is Nepal and the reserves in that area may offer one of the best chances for saving this beautiful predator from extinction. India today has the largest number of tigers, with between 3,300 and 4,700 in the wild.
In 1930 it was believed that there were at least 100,000 of the eight subspecies of tiger in various parts of Asia. Probably fewer than 6,000 of these magnificent animals remain in the wild today. In the last two decades alone, the world has seen two subspecies of tigers disappear forever. By the 1950s, tigers living around the Caspian Sea were extinct. Populations of tigers that once inhabited the islands of Bali and Java are now extinct. The last Balinese tiger was killed in the 1930s; the last Javan tiger sighting occurred in 1972. The South China tiger, with at best 20 to 30 individuals, is nearly extinct in the wild, and the Siberian tigers number only 300 to 400. Much of their habitat has been destroyed by war or by government agricultural programs in the various Asian nations. Poaching is also taking its toll; both for the beautiful striped coats and for a thriving black market in tiger body parts for "medicinal" purposes.
Tigers are most active at night. They stalk and ambush their prey from about 30 feet. Their large shoulders and forepaws allow them to grab prey by the back of the neck or throat. They are very stong and powerful and can haul up to 1000 pounds.
Most tigers are water loving, especially when it is hot. They live in very dense jungles with a lot of vegetation.
The stripes are different on each animal, they are like their fingerprint. They are imprinted on their skin exactly as on their fur. The tiger makes chuffing sound as a greeting that is unique to the tiger. Roars are plaintive and they are usually a calling for their mates.
The tiger gestation period is about 103 days. A tiger can give birth to from 1-7 cubs.
 
 
 
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Shambala is a member of the American Sanctuary Association.